Tag: sys.dm_exec_cached_plans

Can You Dig It? – StmtSimple Element

We’re up to the seventh post on the in the plan cache series.  This time we’ll be talking about the last of the possible children for the Statements elements – the StmtSimple element.  StmtSimple, commonly referred to as statement simple, can contain the plan information for a query plan, a store procedure, or a user…

Can You Dig It? – StmtCursor and StmtReceive Elements

Follow the rest of this series at the Can You Dig It? – Plan Cache series introduction post. She can dig it! D Sharon Pruitt A few posts ago in the plan cache series I discussed the children for the Statements element.  I’ve gotten through two of the elements and in this post we’ll be…

Can You Dig It? – StmtUseDb Element

Follow the rest of this series at the Can You Dig It? – Plan Cache series introduction post. She can dig it! D Sharon Pruitt The last post in the plan cache series discussed the children for the Statements element.  As I noted in that post, there are five possible children.  This post will focus…

Can You Dig It? – Parallelism in the Plan Cache

Follow the rest of this series at the Can You Dig It? – Plan Cache series introduction post. She can dig it! D Sharon Pruitt In the lead in to this post, I talked about how the plan cache can be a gold mine of information.  There are a number of places that one can…

Can You Dig It? – The Plan Cache

Follow the rest of this series at the Can You Dig It? – Plan Cache series introduction post. She can dig it! D Sharon Pruitt In this new series of posts, I plan to investigate the SQL Server plan cache.  We’ll start with a little introduction of the plan cache and move into ways in…

Really Search Cache for Execution Plans

Today’s stored procedure for the DBADiagnostics database is a re-hash of a post I did a couple months ago.  The reason for re-hashing the procedure is that when I used it last week I found out there were some serious issues with its results.  Some plans were being duplicated and the performance statistics weren’t accurate…